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HomeNEWSGoogle tells you how much pollution you generate when using Gmail •...

Google tells you how much pollution you generate when using Gmail • ENTER.CO

Every human activity, however minimal, and even those that seem invisible, generates an impact on the environment. Send an email, upload a file to Google Drive, listen to music on your favorite platform, watch a streaming series or send a sticker to your friends on WhatsApp, too.

Transmitting data requires energy, and that is why there are studies that seek to measure the carbon footprint left by the Internet. Estimates made by organizations such as The Ship Project, for example, indicate that about 4% of global greenhouse gas emissions are a product of the infrastructure that allows information technologies to work. This means that the ICT industry would generate pollution greater than or similar to that currently caused by air transport (approximately 3.6%, according to the Climate Watch platform).

For this reason, Google announced the launch of a new tool that will allow each of its users to know the carbon footprint left by the use of their Gmail accounts or Workspace tools such as Drive. The function will be called Carbon Footprint for Google Workspace, it will track the emissions of the use that each profile makes of Google Cloud, in order to calculate the amount of energy that it takes for the company to store the information of each of its clients.

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The tool seeks to make its users aware of the ecological impact of their Internet habits, but above all, so that they can learn about the resources used by the Mountain View company to ensure that a server (which, in general terms, is a computer that must be powered by electricity to work), can guarantee the efficiency and execution of services such as Calendar or Meet.

According to a statement issued by the company, Carbon Footprint for Google Workspace would officially arrive in early 2023.

Images: Unsplash

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